Two-thirds of children with concussions not receiving medical follow-ups

Two-thirds of children with concussions not receiving medical follow-ups

By: York University

In one of the first studies in Canada to look at pediatric concussion and follow-up, Professor Alison Macpherson in the Faculty of Health, School of Kinesiology & Health Science at York University and former York University Ph.D. student Liraz Fridman, conducted research that included data from over 120,000 children aged 5-19 years of age. The goal of the study was to determine whether children and youth with concussion receive follow-up visits in accordance with the recommended guidelines.

 

Pediatric Concussion Called ‘Grossly’ Underdiagnosed in ED

Pediatric Concussion Called ‘Grossly’ Underdiagnosed in ED

By: Ryan Basen

WASHINGTON — Concussions were “grossly” underdiagnosed among children presenting to a Level 1 trauma center’s pediatric emergency department, according to a study presented here.

The investigators, with the New Jersey Medical School’s Department of Emergency Medicine in Newark, concluded that providers need to be better educated about recognizing traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Pediatric concussion rates 5% higher than reported by EDs

Pediatric concussion rates 5% higher than reported by EDs

By: Veliz P, et al.

Concussions are prevalent among teenagers in the United States, with 19.5% of adolescents diagnosed with at least one incident and 5.5% diagnosed with more than one incident, according to a research letter published in JAMA.

According to the researchers, this rate is approximately 4% to 5% higher than what is reported by emergency departments in the U.S.

Girl soccer players 400% more likely to return to play after concussion

Girl soccer players 400% more likely to return to play after concussion

By: Healio

Although concussion guidelines recommend not returning to play the same day an injury is sustained, girl soccer players were 414% more likely to return to the field that same day than were boys, according to a research presented at the AAP 2017 National Conference & Exhibition.

“The girl soccer players were 5 times more likely than boys to return to play on the same day as their concussion,” Shane M. Miller, MD, FAAP, a pediatric sports medicine specialist at the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, said in a press release.

Your child has a concussion. Now what?

Your child has a concussion. Now what?

By: Dr. Danielle Ransom

Your child is in the thick of the game, running her heart out in a race with an opponent to chase down the ball. Suddenly, that opponent throws an elbow, striking your daughter in the temple. Your daughter crumples to the field, lying motionless for what seems like an eternity. The referee stops play and you and her coach rush to her side. She appears dazed, but is alert and able to count the fingers held up by her coach. She walks to the sideline without assistance and you think all is well.

Understanding Concussions in Youth Sports

Understanding Concussions in Youth Sports

By: Johns Hopkins Children’s Hospital

Fall sports are back in full swing. Sports related concussion seems to be on the rise. Patrick Mularoni, M.D., is the medical director of the Pediatric Sports Medicine program at Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital. He is helping parents and coaches better understand concussions and how to treat the student athlete.

A concussion is a brain injury that occurs after trauma to the head or body. Concussion can occur in any sport or activity and can be caused by a blow to the body with no hit to the head. Our sports medicine department treated more than 3,000 athletes with concussions in the past five years, and although the majority came from traditional contact sports such as football, lacrosse, hockey and wrestling, we also have seen concussions in gymnasts, competitive swimmers and in recreational sports such as skateboarding.

ProFysio: The truth about concussions

ProFysio: The truth about concussions

As our children prepare for their upcoming school year and sports teams begin camps, practice or try-outs, parents should educate themselves on some of the potential injuries that can be sustained throughout the year, including multiple orthopedic injuries or overuse injuries that occur with poor form or repetitive activities, as well as the hot topic of concussions.

Sports concussion prevalence is on the rise with the CDC reporting more than 3.8 million concussions per year, double what was reported 10 years prior. The increases can be a result of increased number of participants in sports, the increase in incidence or most likely the increased awareness of the importance of early diagnosis.

New Study: Some school principals unwilling to make accomodations for students with concussions

New Study: Some school principals unwilling to make accomodations for students with concussions

By: Clark Fouraker

New research being presented in Jacksonville this weekend puts statistics behind the idea that medical professionals and educators need to communicate more about what students with concussions need to recover. Many times, the traumatic brain injury, estimated to occur in 13 percent of all high school students, forces a student to miss a portion of the school year during recovery.

Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

By: Cleveland Clinic

For Starters, they’re not just football injuries.

People often associate concussions in youth sports with football. But the problem goes far beyond America’s most popular sport.

“We know that there are more student athletes participating in sports than ever before,” says Jason Genin, DO, a sports and orthopaedic medicine specialist with Cleveland Clinic Sports Health. “We are also recognizing that with increasing numbers of participants comes increasing numbers of injuries.”

“Better education among parents, coaches and kids is critical,” says Richard So, MD, a pediatrician at Cleveland Clinic Children’s. With that in mind, Dr. So and Dr. Genin seek to bust several common myths and misconceptions about youth sports and concussions.

Many kids still don’t report concussion symptoms. How can we change that?

Many kids still don’t report concussion symptoms. How can we change that?

By: J. Douglas Coatsworth, Professor of Human Development and Family Studies – Colorado State University

As Superbowl LI between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots approaches, football fans reflect on a season of intense competition, hard-fought battles and the tenacity of elite professional athletes. Among the over 100 million fans watching the game, this Sunday will be approximately three million youth athletes who play the game themselves.

Entangled in the enthusiasm and attention to professional football is the conversation of concussive injury and how playing professional football is related to brain injuries, neurocognitive problems and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Concussion Concerns Influence Whether Parents Allow Children to Play Sports

Concussion Concerns Influence Whether Parents Allow Children to Play Sports

By: American Osteopathic Association

A Harris Poll survey conducted online in March 2017 on behalf of the American Osteopathic Association asked over 1,000 U.S. parents whether they allow or plan to allow their children to play sports given the risk of concussion—51 percent said yes, while 33 percent said it depends on the sport.

The remaining 16 percent of parents ruled out sports for their kids because of concussion risks.

Kids are more susceptible to brain injury, and concussion has implications beyond what we thought

Kids are more susceptible to brain injury, and concussion has implications beyond what we thought

By: Pankaj Sah, Director – Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland. Co-authored by Donna Lu, science writer at the Queensland Brain Institute.

Head knocks in childhood are by no means uncommon, yet they may have lasting negative effects. New research has found a link between concussion in childhood and adverse medical and social outcomes as an adult.

Researchers from the United Kingdom, United States and Sweden looked at data from the entire Swedish population born between 1973 and 1982 – some 1.1 million people – to analyse the effect of experiencing a traumatic brain injury in the first 25 years of life.

10 signs your child has experienced a severe concussion

10 signs your child has experienced a severe concussion

By: Joseph Alejandria

Your child has been hurt playing sports and has had a concussion. As a parent, you want to know what to do, and what to look for, to make sure your child has a successful and fast recovery.

Most concussions will resolve themselves with time and rest. But if your child has sustained a more severe injury, further treatment may be required.

Here is what to look for to determine if your child has experienced a significant concussion.

Concussion in children: What are the effects?

Concussion in children: What are the effects?

By: Sherilyn W. Driscoll, M.D.

I’m concerned about childhood head injuries caused by contact sports. What are the possible effects of concussion in children?

Most sports-related head injuries, such as concussions — which temporarily interfere with the way the brain works — are mild and allow for complete recovery. However, concussion in children also can pose serious health risks.

Concussion

Concussion

By: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) caused by a blow or jolt to the head or body that causes the brain to shake. The shaking can cause the brain to not work normally and can result in serious side effects. Each year, thousands of children and youth are diagnosed with concussion — only half are sports related.

Concussion Fact Sheet

Concussion Fact Sheet

By: Children’s Hospital – St. Louis

What is a concussion?

This fact sheet is for parents of children and teens who have recently had a concussion. It will tell you what to expect over the next days and weeks and offer some suggestions for helping your child through the recovery period.

Other terms for a concussion include “head injury” and “mild traumatic brain injury.” A concussion usually is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. in most cases, children hit their heads without getting a concussion.  That is because the brain is protected by the skull which is a very hard covering made of bone that works like a helmet. But if the head is hit hard enough, the brain can be shaken around inside the skull causing a concussion. Common causes of a concussion are car or ATV crashes, falls from bikes and skateboards, and sports-related accidents.

10 Signs Your Child’s Concussion Is Serious — and What to Do

10 Signs Your Child’s Concussion Is Serious — and What to Do

By: Brain and Spine Team – Cleveland Clinic

Trip to ER is best if you see any of these red-flag symptoms

If your child suffers a concussion, whether while playing sports or from a fall or other accident, keep a close watch for symptoms of more severe brain trauma.

“Parents should be concerned about a series of things we call red-flag issues,” says neurologist Andrew Russman, DO. “These are symptoms that warrant a prompt evaluation because they could signal something more worrisome than just a concussion.”

Concussion FAQs

Concussion FAQs

By: Children’s National

Concussion basics

The SCORE team wants parents, coaches, and teachers to be informed about concussions. Please use this section to learn how to identify, treat, and when to send kids back into the game or school.

The term mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is used interchangeably with the term concussion. A mild TBI or concussion is a disruption in the function of the brain as a result of a forceful blow to the head, either direct or indirect. This disturbance of brain function is typically not detected with a normal CT scan or MRI. A concussion results in a set of physical, cognitive emotional and/or sleep-related symptoms and often does not involve a loss of consciousness. Duration of symptoms is highly variable and may last from several minutes to days, weeks, months, or even longer in some cases.

 

 

ImPACT Applications Inc. is the maker of ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test), ImPACT Pediatric, and ImPACT Quick Test, all FDA cleared medical devices that assist in the screening, assessment, and management of concussion.

ImPACT Applications Inc. is the maker of ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test), ImPACT Pediatric, and ImPACT Quick Test, all FDA cleared medical devices that assist in the screening, assessment, and management of concussion.