New Study: Some school principals unwilling to make accomodations for students with concussions

New Study: Some school principals unwilling to make accomodations for students with concussions

By: Clark Fouraker

New research being presented in Jacksonville this weekend puts statistics behind the idea that medical professionals and educators need to communicate more about what students with concussions need to recover. Many times, the traumatic brain injury, estimated to occur in 13 percent of all high school students, forces a student to miss a portion of the school year during recovery.

Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

Busting 7 Myths About Kids, Concussions and Sports

By: Cleveland Clinic

For Starters, they’re not just football injuries.

People often associate concussions in youth sports with football. But the problem goes far beyond America’s most popular sport.

“We know that there are more student athletes participating in sports than ever before,” says Jason Genin, DO, a sports and orthopaedic medicine specialist with Cleveland Clinic Sports Health. “We are also recognizing that with increasing numbers of participants comes increasing numbers of injuries.”

“Better education among parents, coaches and kids is critical,” says Richard So, MD, a pediatrician at Cleveland Clinic Children’s. With that in mind, Dr. So and Dr. Genin seek to bust several common myths and misconceptions about youth sports and concussions.

Many kids still don’t report concussion symptoms. How can we change that?

Many kids still don’t report concussion symptoms. How can we change that?

By: J. Douglas Coatsworth, Professor of Human Development and Family Studies – Colorado State University

As Superbowl LI between the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots approaches, football fans reflect on a season of intense competition, hard-fought battles and the tenacity of elite professional athletes. Among the over 100 million fans watching the game, this Sunday will be approximately three million youth athletes who play the game themselves.

Entangled in the enthusiasm and attention to professional football is the conversation of concussive injury and how playing professional football is related to brain injuries, neurocognitive problems and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE).

Concussion Concerns Influence Whether Parents Allow Children to Play Sports

Concussion Concerns Influence Whether Parents Allow Children to Play Sports

By: American Osteopathic Association

A Harris Poll survey conducted online in March 2017 on behalf of the American Osteopathic Association asked over 1,000 U.S. parents whether they allow or plan to allow their children to play sports given the risk of concussion—51 percent said yes, while 33 percent said it depends on the sport.

The remaining 16 percent of parents ruled out sports for their kids because of concussion risks.

Kids are more susceptible to brain injury, and concussion has implications beyond what we thought

Kids are more susceptible to brain injury, and concussion has implications beyond what we thought

By: Pankaj Sah, Director – Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland. Co-authored by Donna Lu, science writer at the Queensland Brain Institute.

Head knocks in childhood are by no means uncommon, yet they may have lasting negative effects. New research has found a link between concussion in childhood and adverse medical and social outcomes as an adult.

Researchers from the United Kingdom, United States and Sweden looked at data from the entire Swedish population born between 1973 and 1982 – some 1.1 million people – to analyse the effect of experiencing a traumatic brain injury in the first 25 years of life.

10 signs your child has experienced a severe concussion

10 signs your child has experienced a severe concussion

By: Joseph Alejandria

Your child has been hurt playing sports and has had a concussion. As a parent, you want to know what to do, and what to look for, to make sure your child has a successful and fast recovery.

Most concussions will resolve themselves with time and rest. But if your child has sustained a more severe injury, further treatment may be required.

Here is what to look for to determine if your child has experienced a significant concussion.

Concussion in children: What are the effects?

Concussion in children: What are the effects?

By: Sherilyn W. Driscoll, M.D.

I’m concerned about childhood head injuries caused by contact sports. What are the possible effects of concussion in children?

Most sports-related head injuries, such as concussions — which temporarily interfere with the way the brain works — are mild and allow for complete recovery. However, concussion in children also can pose serious health risks.

Concussion

Concussion

By: Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

What is a concussion?

A concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) caused by a blow or jolt to the head or body that causes the brain to shake. The shaking can cause the brain to not work normally and can result in serious side effects. Each year, thousands of children and youth are diagnosed with concussion — only half are sports related.

Concussion Fact Sheet

Concussion Fact Sheet

By: Children’s Hospital – St. Louis

What is a concussion?

This fact sheet is for parents of children and teens who have recently had a concussion. It will tell you what to expect over the next days and weeks and offer some suggestions for helping your child through the recovery period.

Other terms for a concussion include “head injury” and “mild traumatic brain injury.” A concussion usually is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. in most cases, children hit their heads without getting a concussion.  That is because the brain is protected by the skull which is a very hard covering made of bone that works like a helmet. But if the head is hit hard enough, the brain can be shaken around inside the skull causing a concussion. Common causes of a concussion are car or ATV crashes, falls from bikes and skateboards, and sports-related accidents.

10 Signs Your Child’s Concussion Is Serious — and What to Do

10 Signs Your Child’s Concussion Is Serious — and What to Do

By: Brain and Spine Team – Cleveland Clinic

Trip to ER is best if you see any of these red-flag symptoms

If your child suffers a concussion, whether while playing sports or from a fall or other accident, keep a close watch for symptoms of more severe brain trauma.

“Parents should be concerned about a series of things we call red-flag issues,” says neurologist Andrew Russman, DO. “These are symptoms that warrant a prompt evaluation because they could signal something more worrisome than just a concussion.”

Concussion FAQs

Concussion FAQs

By: Children’s National

Concussion basics

The SCORE team wants parents, coaches, and teachers to be informed about concussions. Please use this section to learn how to identify, treat, and when to send kids back into the game or school.

The term mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is used interchangeably with the term concussion. A mild TBI or concussion is a disruption in the function of the brain as a result of a forceful blow to the head, either direct or indirect. This disturbance of brain function is typically not detected with a normal CT scan or MRI. A concussion results in a set of physical, cognitive emotional and/or sleep-related symptoms and often does not involve a loss of consciousness. Duration of symptoms is highly variable and may last from several minutes to days, weeks, months, or even longer in some cases.

Prevention Is Key To Reduce Spring Concussion Spike

Prevention Is Key To Reduce Spring Concussion Spike

By: Dr. Stacy Suskauer, M.D., Huffington Post Contributor

Research shows that the fall season, when many popular contact sports are in session, is associated, naturally, with a dramatic spike in the number of concussions among kids. That’s not the only time to stay vigilant, however, because each spring we see another seasonal increase in brain injury in our concussion clinic.

Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

By: FDA Consumer Reports

A car accident. A football tackle. An unfortunate fall. These things—and more—can cause head injuries. Head injuries can happen to anyone, at any age, and they can damage the brain.

Here’s how damage can happen: A sudden movement of the head and brain can cause the brain to bounce or twist in the skull, stretching and injuring brain cells and creating chemical changes. This damage is called a traumatic brain injury, or “TBI.”

As kids prepare for school sports, and many adults look ahead to fall activities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is researching TBI—and encouraging the development of new medical devices to help diagnose and treat it.

ImPACT Applications Launches First Pediatric Medical Device for Concussion Management

ImPACT Applications Launches First Pediatric Medical Device for Concussion Management

By: ImPACT News

ImPACT Applications announces ImPACT Pediatric, its newest innovation in the field of concussion management. The first and only FDA-approved concussion-specific tool designed for individuals ages 5-11, ImPACT Pediatric provides health care professionals with objective measures of neurocognitive functioning for evaluation and management of concussion in younger children.

ImPACT Pediatric is an iPad-based computerized test that is individually administered, engaging for children, and easy to use in a clinical setting. It addresses a gap that has existed in the medical device community for years—a lack of normed and validated computerized neurocognitive assessment tools for efficiently and effectively measuring neurocognitive function in this age group. Created by ImPACT Applications, the developer of the FDA-approved ImPACT® computerized neurocognitive concussion assessment and management tool, ImPACT Pediatric offers pediatric patients the same advantages seen by more than 10 million ImPACT test takers.

We Must Challenge Assumptions about Pediatric Concussions

We Must Challenge Assumptions about Pediatric Concussions

By: Debra Houry, MD, MPH

It’s easy to assume that most pediatric concussion cases are diagnosed in the emergency department (ED). However, new research, published this month in JAMA Pediatrics, reveals that this may not be the case. And, as a result, we could be drastically underestimating the number of pediatric concussions in the United States.

Researchers from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and CDC’s Injury Center found that out of all CHOP concussion patients, the vast majority (82 percent) entered the healthcare system through a primary care visit.

Concussions In Youth Sports Up 500 Percent According To Study

Concussions In Youth Sports Up 500 Percent According To Study

By: Ben Rains

The concussion issues in sports have been a huge topic for years, especially in the NFL. A new study published by FAIR Health suggests that the issues have continued to become a huge concern across a range of youth sports in the United States for boys and girls.

FAIR Health’s study concluded that concussion diagnoses for people under the age of 22 rose 500 percent from 2010 to 2014. FAIR Health is a not-for-profit whose “mission is to bring transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information.” This study was conducted “based on healthcare insurance claims 2007-2015, ages 0-22 years.”

The study shows that the highest prevalence of concussions occurred between September and October every year. Those two months usually span almost the entire youth football season across the United States. High school age kids are the most likely to suffer a concussion, with 46 percent of diagnosed concussions occurring for those between 15 to 18.

CONCUSSIONS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS (PRNewsFoto/FAIR Health)

 

4 Myths About Kids and Concussions

4 Myths About Kids and Concussions

By: Dr. Stacy Suskauer, M.D.

When it comes to concussions, there are two things parents want to know: How to determine if a child has one and how to make it better. During my experiences helping parents and patients seeking help for a suspected concussion, I hear many myths about both diagnosis and treatment.